Posts tagged: knossos

Things seen – May 2011

The Queen of Prince Rupert

The Queen of Prince Rupert

  • The Queen of Prince Rupert will become one of the few BC Ferries to see further service outside Canada following her sale to Fijian interests for inter-island use. As noted in the Fiji Sun, the ship has been renamed Lomaiviti Princess and there are some pictures of the ship, still in Canada, on the West Coast Ferries forum.

    A variety of more historical images of the Queen of Prince Rupert can be found here.

  • Perhaps due to her name, the scrapping of the Greek-owned Grecia (ex-Espresso Livorno/Espresso Grecia) in Aliaga attracted more attention than most, with youtube videos of her before the final departure and, most interestingly, of her final charge for the beach. The ship grounds herself alongside the remains of the ex-Jadrolinija Vanga, chunks of which can be seen being manhandled on shore.

    Navi e Amatori has a later image of the Grecia with demolition work in full swing.

  • Rather unnoticed, the most elderly of the 2010 Southern European scrap victims was the Peloritano, which although heavily rebuilt was originally the domestic German ferry the Fehmarn of 1927. Her final days are captured in this image at Aliaga, with fellow Italian domestic veteran the Capri (ex-Kvamsøy) in the background.
  • An easier way of disposing of unwanted ships was demonstrated by the treatment of the ro-ro Jolly Rubino; having run aground several years ago, she was stripped then sunk via a controlled demolition to form an artificial reef.
  • The occasional bumps and scrapes are a fact of life, especially for ships in relatively tight or difficult harbours. The Elyros had a small scrape with her berth at Souda but the Isola di Procida’s break for freedom in Napoli ended by slamming into the side of one of her CAREMAR fleetmates.

    Going back a few years, the Boa Vista (ex-Speedlink Vanguard/Normandie Shipper) provided the first of Kystlink’s various mishaps when she ran aground off Hirtshals, captured in a series of images here.

  • Moving onto more calamitous demises, and, whilst not a ferry, this remarkable footage from aboard the Achille Lauro before her fiery end is worth viewing.
  • The Moby Prince at Bastia

    The Moby Prince at Bastia

  • Ferry fires can be devastating. Perhaps most famous is the Moby Prince, and whilst the footage here on board the ship after the fire is interesting, the amateur video taken aboard by one of the doomed passengers, included in the opening sequence of this Italian documentary, is truly haunting. That video’s survival supports the theory that the ferocity of the fire was less the cause of death than the toxins which the fire gave off.
  • Pictures aboard the raised Herald of Free Enterprise are similarly poignant.
  • A more modern fire victim was the LISCO Gloria whose charred remains were captured up close for the Danish media.
  • I have tried to keep an eye on the latest happenings with the half-sunken ARMAS ferry Assalama, still stranded off the port of Tarfaya, Morocco. A relatively recent image is here whilst there are more images from the day of the disaster here.
  • The Sea Serenade at Corfu, August 1999

    The Sea Serenade at Corfu, August 1999

  • Whatever happened to the Sea Serenade of Poseidon Lines? Whilst, as the Arielle, her sister achieved the slightly dismal distinction of being Hellenic Mediterranean Lines’ last ever ship before sailing for scrap in 2006, the elder of the former Japanese pair rather disappeared off the radar since finishing service nearly a decade ago. She ended up renamed the Marinos D and laid up at a shipyard in Izola, Slovenia. The recent news that the floating dock there has been sold to Turkish interests has also led to speculation that the ship herself will finally also be making a move – presumably for scrap.
  • Another crop of videos from Greece:
    An atmospheric trip aboard the locally-built Lemnos of Nomikos Lines;
    A bit of the old school: a race between NEL’s Theofilos and GA Ferries’ Dimitroula;
    The Alcaeos (ex. Marella) of NEL Lines;
    Remarkable footage during a fire aboard the Knossos (ex-Svea);
    Morning arrivals in Piraeus from the Golden age – including the Knossos, Sappho and Ialyssos;
    The introduction of Fragline’s Georgios (1971)
  • What is the most popular ferry in Greece? Who knows, but the distinctly unscientific method of measuring bookings made through Viva Travel indicates it is, curiously, the Blue Horizon. Google Translate version here.
  • In Croatia, the white fleet of Jadrolinija, past and present, continues to provide splendid internet fodder, from the company’s former cruise ship the Dalmacija featuring in the video for this mid-90s Techno classic by Marusha to the strangely mesmerising 2010 time lapse video of the Marko Polo loading at Rijeka.

    There are also some interesting still images out there – such as some more classic images of veterans at Rijeka here, here and here and a superb recent shot of the little Rogac ferry Lastovo obliterated by spray.

    The image above of the Vis (ex-Sydfyn) at Ubli last Summer is almost identical to this one of her former fleetmate, the Slavija I (later Europa I).

    Lastly, there has been local access to the long laid-up Ero (the heavily modified remains of the 1931-built former Danish domestic ferry Aerø). Although reported sold for scrap in some quarters, she remains for now amongst the Jadrolinija reserve fleet in Cres. Below are some links to a series of recent images of and on board the old ship (click on the thumbnails to go to the original urls):

    img20110329115515 3764_TN

    img20110329115653 3765_TN

    img20110329115822 3766_TN

    img20110329115950 3767_TN

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    Heading back several decades, the same ship can be seen, amongst a variety of others, in these vintage Danish films from the early 1960s which pleasingly capture a completely lost age:

    Film 1
    Film 2

  • One of the most recent ships to head to Croatia is the former Pomerania, now Blue Line’s Dalmatia; seen above at Ancona in May, her final Copenhagen-ÅšwinoujÅ›cie sailing was captured in a brutally honest slideshow for the Danish daily newspaper Politiken.
  • A couple of Tirrenia items:
    A classic and slightly peculiar TV advert;
    Lastly, a piece of Blair-Witchesque cinematic genius as the sense of terror mounts in this video of a gentleman roaming the almost-deserted decks of the now-withdrawn Domiziana , before finally locking himself into his cabin, presumably to slit his wrists.
  • The Domiziana at Olbia, September 2010

    The Domiziana at Olbia, September 2010

    Picture of the week: Ancona (ex-Knossos, Saga, Hispania, Svea)

    The Ancona at Ancona, August 2009. Click for larger image.

    The Ancona at Ancona, August 2009. Click for larger image.


    Previous image

    Previous image

    For more on the Ancona, click here.

    The Ancona (ex-Knossos, Saga, Hispania, Svea)

    The Ancona at Ancona

    The Ancona at Ancona


    From Ancona to Split with the Ancona of Blue Lines.

    The Ancona off Ancona in 2004, before the masts were regrettably painted blue.

    The Ancona off Ancona in 2004, before the masts were regrettably painted blue.

    Blue Lines’ Ancona is the former Knossos of Minoan Lines, and before that the Saga, Hispania and originally the Svea of the Rederi AB Svea and latterly Swedish Lloyd. Today she plies the route between Ancona and Split year-round, accompanied in peak season by her fleetmate, the Split 1700. Presented below are a series of pictures of and on board the ship from the Summers of 2007 and 2008.

    See also this deckplan photograph of the ship as the Ancona, and here in her original guise as the Svea.

    Walking down from the main railway station, the ferry port veers into view with the Ancona sheltering behind the passenger terminal.

    Walking down from the main railway station, Ancona ferry port veers into view with the Ancona herself sheltering behind the passenger terminal.

    The Ancona

    The Ancona

    The Ancona on her berth, adjacent to the passenger terminal

    The Ancona on her berth, adjacent to the passenger terminal

    Looking aft

    Looking aft


    Boarding is via the vehicle deck - the relatively low headroom caused problems in her early days on the North Sea but has not stopped a successful later career.

    Boarding is via the vehicle deck - the relatively low headroom caused problems in her early days on the North Sea but has not stopped a successful later career.


    Walking up from the vehicle deck, passengers are directed along one of the two side promenades, heading forward in the direction of the lobby.

    Walking up from the vehicle deck, passengers are directed along one of the two side promenades, heading forward in the direction of the lobby.

    The port side promenade.

    The port side promenade.

    The main lobby is centrally located on Deck 5 (originally A Deck) which is otherwise given over to cabins.

    The main lobby is centrally located on Deck 5 (originally A Deck) which is otherwise given over to cabins.

    Reception is at the forward end of the lobby.

    Reception is at the forward end of the lobby.

    The reception desk.

    The reception desk.

    The reception desk.

    The reception desk.

    Facing reception, on the aft side of the lobby is this small counter-service Duty Free shop.

    Facing reception, on the aft side of the lobby is this small counter-service Duty Free shop.


    The top of the port-side staircase leading up from the lobby to the cafeteria, showing the public facilities available....

    The top of the port-side staircase leading up from the lobby to the cafeteria, showing the public facilities available....

    The cafeteria entrance.

    The cafeteria entrance.

    The cafeteria, looking forward from the entrance.

    The cafeteria, looking forward from the entrance.

    The self-service servery area. (SEM picture)

    The self-service servery area. (SEM picture)

    Heading aft from the cafeteria, we enter the port side arcade.

    Heading aft from the cafeteria, we enter the port side arcade.

    From the other end, looking forward on the port side of the Saloon Deck.

    From the other end, looking forward on the port side of the Saloon Deck.

    One of the two aft port lounges has had casino and gaming equipment installed, but it still retains its original bar counter.

    One of the two aft port lounges has had casino and gaming equipment installed, but it still retains its original bar counter.

    Further aft, the aftmost port-side lounge is now rather sparsely furnished, with a big screen which is used to show football matches.

    Further aft, the aftmost port-side lounge is now rather sparsely furnished, with a big screen which is used to show football matches.

    The aft port lounge.

    The aft port lounge.


    Moving over to the starboard side, here is the aft lounge.

    Moving over to the starboard side, here is the aft lounge.

    Another view.

    Another view.

    The flow of the rooms is clear in this view of the bar, just forward of the aft lounge which can be seen in the background.

    The flow of the rooms is clear in this view of the bar, just forward of the aft lounge which can be seen in the background.

    The bar counter.

    The bar counter.

    A further view, looking across to port.

    A further view, looking across to port.

    The wall-mounted light fittings in the bar give a hint of space-age excitement, albeit more Dan Dare than Apollo 11.

    The wall-mounted light fittings in the bar give a hint of space-age excitement, albeit more Dan Dare than Apollo 11.

    Moving forward again, this vestibule separates the starboard gallery from the bar area.

    Moving forward again, this vestibule separates the starboard gallery from the bar area.

    Looking forward in the starboard gallery, with the entrance to the chapel visible on the left.

    Looking forward in the starboard gallery, with the entrance to the chapel visible on the left.

    The small chapel was originally designated as a 'Club Room', and when the ship was the Hispania sailing from Southampton to Spain it became a casino.

    The small chapel was originally designated as a 'Club Room', and when the ship was the Hispania sailing from Southampton to Spain it became a casino.

    The same room with an alternative seating layout.

    The same room with an alternative seating layout.

    A final view of the starboard arcade, looking aft.

    A final view of the starboard arcade, looking aft.

    At the forward end, these rather magnificent doors lead into the restaurant area. The location of the shop originally housed a pair of private function/dining rooms and on the Hispania became the 'Alice in Wonderland Children's Restaurant'.

    At the forward end, these rather magnificent doors lead into the restaurant area. The location of the shop originally housed a pair of private function/dining rooms and on the Hispania became the 'Alice in Wonderland Children's Restaurant'.


    The restaurant, forward on the starboard side of the ship.

    The restaurant, forward on the starboard side of the ship.

    The restaurant.

    The restaurant.


    The restaurant.

    The restaurant.

    The restaurant.

    The restaurant.

    The restaurant.

    The restaurant.

    The seating area forward to port can be opened up to either the restaurant to starboard or the cafeteria, just aft, as demand dictates.

    The seating area forward to port can be opened up to either the restaurant to starboard or the cafeteria, just aft, as demand dictates.

    The only other interior public space of note is this unremarkable reclining seat lounge up on Boat Deck.

    The only other interior public space of note is this unremarkable reclining seat lounge up on Boat Deck.

    Just forward of the reclining seats, these metal grilles in the lobby area betray the ship's two class history. As the Ancona she is one class, and this was also the case, technically, when built. In operation for Minoan Lines however a strict division was maintained. These grilles have now been removed.

    Just forward of the reclining seats, these metal grilles in the lobby area betray the ship's two class history. As the Ancona she is one class, and this was also the case, technically, when built. In operation for Minoan Lines however a strict division was maintained. These grilles have now been removed.

    The bulk of the overnight accommodation is provided in two and four berth inside and outside cabins on Decks 5, 4 and 2. Here is a 4-berth inside on Deck 4.

    The bulk of the overnight accommodation is provided in two and four berth inside and outside cabins on Decks 5, 4 and 2. Here is a 4-berth inside on Deck 4.

    The ship was designed for relatively short crossings, but each berth was provided with one drawer in this unit and another in the fittings adjacent to the bunks.

    The ship was designed for relatively short crossings, but each berth was provided with one drawer in this unit and another in the fittings adjacent to the bunks.

    A standard 4 berth outside cabin.

    A standard 4 berth outside cabin.

    One of the main cabin corridors.

    One of the main cabin corridors.

    Ancona Miscellany - throughout the ship there are reminders of her Swedish origins.

    Ancona Miscellany - throughout the ship there are reminders of her Swedish origins.

    Ancona Miscellany

    Ancona Miscellany

    Ancona Miscellany

    Ancona Miscellany

    Ancona Miscellany

    Ancona Miscellany

    Ancona Miscellany

    Ancona Miscellany

    Ancona Miscellany

    Ancona Miscellany

    Ancona Miscellany

    Ancona Miscellany


    The outside deck adjacent to the aft lounges on the Saloon Deck.

    The outside deck adjacent to the aft lounges on the Saloon Deck.

    Another view of the aft deck space on the Saloon Deck.

    Another view of the aft deck space on the Saloon Deck.

    A deck bar can be found on the deck above.

    A deck bar can be found on the deck above.

    The deck space pictured, just forward of the funnel, is now closed off to passengers.

    The deck space around the funnel, pictured in 2004, is now closed off to passengers.

    The covered area just forward of the funnel.

    The covered area just forward of the funnel.

    The Ancona's funnel.

    The Ancona's funnel.

    The funnel seen from the starboard Boat Deck.

    The funnel seen from the starboard Boat Deck.

    The forward superstructure, seen from the forecastle.

    The forward superstructure, seen from the forecastle.

    The ship's bell bears the inscription 'Saga, 1966';. The year of build is correct, but this ship was originally the Svea - the Saga was her sister, although the Svea did later bear the name so the provenance of the bell is uncertain.

    The ship's bell bears the inscription 'Saga, 1966'. The year of build is correct, but this ship was originally the Svea - the Saga was her sister, although the Svea did later bear the name so the provenance of the bell is uncertain.

    The Ancona.

    The Ancona.

    At Ancona in 2007, the Nordlink of Finnlines is seen from the Ancona in the process of being handed over to her owners by the Fincantieri shipyard. The Ancona's sister ship, the ex-Saga, wore these funnel colours during her three year stint as the Finnpartner in the mid-1970s.

    At Ancona in 2007, the Nordlink of Finnlines is seen from the Ancona in the process of being handed over to her owners by the Fincantieri shipyard. The Ancona's sister ship, the ex-Saga, wore these funnel colours during her three year stint as the Finnpartner in the mid-1970s.

    Another view of the port-side promenade.

    Another view of the port-side promenade.

    The starboard outside deck at night.

    The starboard outside deck at night.

    The funnel, floodlit.

    The funnel, floodlit.

    The following morning, taking on the pilot as we approach Split.

    The following morning, taking on the pilot as we approach Split.

    The ship's bridge.

    The ship's bridge.

    Bridge details.

    Bridge details.

    Bridge details.

    Bridge details.

    Looking aft from the bridge wing.

    Looking aft from the bridge wing.

    Approaching Split.

    Approaching Split.

    The Ancona.

    The Ancona.

    The Ancona at Split.

    The Ancona at Split.

    The Ancona at Split.

    The Ancona at Split.

    The Ancona, ex-Svea.

    The Ancona, ex-Svea.

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