Posts tagged: moby

Up close: Banasa (ex-Mette Mols, to become Moby Kiss)

Built 1975 at Helsingor as Mette Mols for Mols Linien’s Ebeltoft-Odden route.
Sold 1996 to Comarit and renamed Banasa for Tangier-Algeciras service.
Re-engined and refitted in 2003/04.
Laid up in Algeciras, Spain, early 2012 following the bankruptcy of her owners.
Towed for scrapping at Aliaga, Turkey, August 2015.
Towed from Aliaga to Perama, Greece, October 2015 following acquisition by European Seaways.
Renamed Galaxy but subsequently re-sold to Moby Lines.
To become Moby Kiss for Livorno-Bastia service.

Photographed March 2014, abandoned on Algeciras breakwater.

The Great Ports: An evening in Olbia

Olbia, the primary port of Sardinia, features one of the greatest concentrations of large overnight ferries in Europe – alongside other Mediterranean megaports such as Piraeus, Genoa and, during rush hour, Igoumenitsa. Although Tirrenia continue to operate to both Civitavecchia (for Rome) and the longer overnight route to Genoa, it is the independent operators who are now the serious players: Moby use a fleet of (in the Summer) six passenger and two freight ships with schedules based on the port, offering departures to Civitavecchia, Livorno, Piombino and Genoa. Grandia Navi Veloci operate to Genoa and SNAV to Civitaecchia. Moby’s big rivals, Tourship, (Corsica-Sardinia Ferries) use the nearby port of Golfo Aranci for their own services to Civitavecchia and Livorno.

I spent an evening in Olbia on 2 September before a departure on GNV’s La Suprema to Genoa. The excellent restaurant in the terminal provides a great vantage point of the comings and goings but it is down on the quayside where the real buzz is. Whereas elsewhere in Italy little Mussolinis jump up and down ferociously citing spurious security concerns at the merest sight of a camera (the tragedy of the once-great port of Genoa being the worst example), in Olbia, where all traffic is domestic and mostly holidaymakers, things are much more relaxed and passenger-friendly. Pedestrians, with ticket or not, are permitted to come and go through an efficient security barrier which where bags are quickly scanned. Thus the principle of public access is retained and friends and family members can come onto the quayside to wave travellers off or welcome them home. And almost everyone is happily taking pictures, enjoying a uniquely nautical travel experience in a friendly atmosphere.

The veteran Costa Marina leaving Olbia - cruise ships berth at the main port amongst the ferries.

The veteran Costa Marina leaving Olbia - cruise ships berth at the main port amongst the ferries.

Moby Otta (ex-Tor Scandinavia) nears the port on her day sailing from Livorno.

Moby Otta (ex-Tor Scandinavia) nears the port on her day sailing from Livorno.

At the freight berths are the Strada Corsa (ex-Stena Transporter/Pride of Flanders) and the Massimo M (originally Fred. Olsen's Balduin and later Tor Neringa).

At the freight berths are the Strada Corsa (ex-Stena Transporter/Pride of Flanders) and the Massimo M (originally Fred. Olsen's Balduin and later Tor Neringa).

The lighthouse guarding the entrance to the port.

The lighthouse guarding the entrance to the port.

In port is the little Domiziana, still in Adriatica colours but now back operating for the parent company Tirrenia and offering a somewhat slow crossing to Genoa.

In port is the little Domiziana, still in Adriatica colours but now back operating for the parent company Tirrenia and offering a somewhat slow crossing to Genoa.

The Domiziana's funnel, still complete with the Venetian winged lion of Adriatica.

The Domiziana's funnel, still complete with the Venetian winged lion of Adriatica.

Strada Corsa - the ship now has Sardinia Ferries funnel colours after the acquisition of her operators by Tourship.

Strada Corsa - the ship now has Sardinia Ferries funnel colours after the acquisition of her operators by Tourship.

Massimo M - since being purchased by Moby in late 2009 she has been reuinted with her two sister ships which were already in the fleet.

Massimo M - since being purchased by Moby in late 2009 she has been reuinted with her two sister ships which were already in the fleet.

The Moby Otta turning in port.

The Moby Otta turning in port.

Three North Sea veterans - on the left is the SNAV Lazio, originally the Olau Britannia and newly arrived in port from Civitavecchia.

Three North Sea veterans - on the left is the SNAV Lazio, originally the Olau Britannia and newly arrived in port from Civitavecchia.

SNAV Lazio.

SNAV Lazio.

Moby Otta.

Moby Otta.

Seen arriving after a speedy day crossing from Genoa is La Suprema, one of Europe's largest and most impressive cruise ferries. W

Seen arriving after a speedy day crossing from Genoa is La Suprema, one of Europe's largest and most impressive cruise ferries.

We shall not linger too long with images of the Nuraghes, Tirrenia's Civitavecchia ship - suffice to say this modern (2004) ship was in predictably poor external condition.

We shall not linger too long with images of the Nuraghes, Tirrenia's Civitavecchia ship - suffice to say this modern (2004) ship was in predictably poor external condition.

La Suprema turning off the berth.

La Suprema turning off the berth.

There follow a series of remarkably unobstructed up-close images of La Suprema coming astern onto her berth. The number of Health & Safety violations the British authorities could come up with from these pictures doesn't bear thinking about.

There follow a series of remarkably unobstructed up-close images of La Suprema coming astern onto her berth. The number of Health & Safety violations the British authorities could come up with from these pictures doesn't bear thinking about.

SNAV Lazio (left) and La Suprema (right). Arriving in the background are the Moby pair Moby Aki (from Piombino) and the freighter Luigi Pa.

SNAV Lazio (left) and La Suprema (right). Arriving in the background are the Moby pair Moby Aki (from Piombino) and the freighter Luigi Pa.

The Moby Fantasy, loading for her overnight sailing to Civitavecchia - where she continues to fight above her weight despite being the smallest of all the competing passenger ferries operating to the port.

The Moby Fantasy, loading for her overnight sailing to Civitavecchia - where she continues to fight above her weight despite being the smallest of all the competing passenger ferries operating to the port.

Not an entirely full car deck for the market leader on this end of peak season crossing - her Civitavecchia rivals must have been even more empty.

Not an entirely full car deck for the market leader on this end of peak season crossing - her Civitavecchia rivals must have been even more empty.

The Moby Wonder, arriving from Civitavecchia, will later form the 2200 to Genoa. Along with her sister, the Moby Freedom, this ship has one of the most hectic schedules in Europe covering nightly Genoa-Olbia (or vice-versa) sailings with day time returns Genoa-Bastia-Genoa or Olbia-Civitavecchia-Olbia in between.

The Moby Wonder, arriving from Civitavecchia, will later form the 2200 to Genoa. Along with her sister, the Moby Freedom, this ship has one of the most hectic schedules in Europe covering nightly Genoa-Olbia (or vice-versa) sailings with day time returns Genoa-Bastia-Genoa or Olbia-Civitavecchia-Olbia in between.

SNAV Lazio, Domiziana and Moby Wonder.

SNAV Lazio, Domiziana and Moby Wonder.

The departure of the Domiziana - although the Strada Romana class have a certain appeal for the enthusiast, the ship's speed disadvantage compared to her rivals makes her operation on the Olbia-Genoa route difficult. Despite leaving an hour earlier than La Suprema and an hour and a half before the Moby Wonder she will not arrive in Genoa until 1000 (compared to the GNV ship's 0630 and Moby's 0730). Despite this, she was not entirely deserted - perhaps because her rivals were full.

The departure of the Domiziana - although the Strada Romana class have a certain appeal for the enthusiast, the ship's speed disadvantage compared to her rivals makes her operation on the Olbia-Genoa route difficult. Despite leaving an hour earlier than La Suprema and an hour and a half before the Moby Wonder she will not arrive in Genoa until 1000 (compared to the GNV ship's 0630 and Moby's 0730). Despite this, she was not entirely deserted - perhaps because her rivals were full.

Cars lining up to board La Suprema with the Nuraghes and the Moby Aki (waiting to leave for Livorno) in the background.

Cars lining up to board La Suprema with the Nuraghes and the Moby Aki (waiting to leave for Livorno) in the background.

Next – a voyage report on board La Suprema.

Pont l’Abbé => Moby Corse

In 2006 Brittany Ferries somewhat unexpectedly chartered the long-serving Duke of Scandinavia (ex-Dana Anglia) from DFDS with Brittany’s Val de Loire heading in the opposite direction. With minimal refurbishment, the ‘Duke’ was put into service as the Pont l’Abbé between Roscoff and Plymouth – she was later purchased but the 2009 arrival of the purpose-built Armorique saw her displaced on the Roscoff run. The economic downturn and a strategic rethink meant that plans for a significant refurbishment and long-term future for the ship with the company were aborted and, unwanted, she was despatched to Saint Nazaire where she laid up for over a year.

The Dana Anglia looking her smartest - in original DFDS livery.

The Dana Anglia looking her smartest - in original DFDS livery.

The Pont l'Abbé

The Pont L’Abbé

Down in the Mediterranean, the islands of Corsica and Sardinia are fiercely competitive ferry battlegrounds with legacy operators SNCM and Tirrenia to a great degree nowadays outmuscled by acquisitive and efficient companies such as Moby Lines, Grandi Navi Veloci and Corsica/Sardinia Ferries. The latter is the dominant force on the France-Corsica routes but Moby is stronger in operations to Sardinia – whilst it has long-standing routes from Italy to the Corsican port of Bastia the company has never been able to make its presence felt on services from France. Determined to break into this market, Moby announced in 2008 that they would be launching a new service from Nice in France to Bastia to begin the following year.

In the end, no service was forthcoming for 2009, but in November of that year, it was revealed that the Pont l’Abbé had been acquired to enable the operation to finally start in 2010 – although by this stage the mainland port had been switched to Toulon. Competing directly against Corsica Ferries’ established and popular operations, the Pont l’Abbé was brought round to Naples where she underwent a fairly thorough refit, emerging as the Moby Corse.

The Moby Corse.

The Moby Corse.

In addition to providing overnight sailings every other night from either end, the ship was scheduled, when in Bastia, to make a day time round trip from there to Livorno on the Italian mainland – essentially repeating some of the sailings made by the Maria Grazia On. in her Summer stint in 2009 and supplementing the core Livorno sailings of the Moby Vincent. Alas, the work on the ‘Corse’ was delayed and so the company’s newest build, the Moby Aki, was briefly deployed for a few weeks instead before the ‘Corse’ finally made it into service in mid May.

This Summer we joined the Moby Corse on a day sailing to Livorno. Almost all areas on board have seen some attention, although the Admiral Pub remains essentially untouched, now being a standard Moby feature ever since its arrival with the former Tor Line sisters Moby Drea and Moby Otta (ex-Prince and Princess of Scandinavia) – indeed other ships such as the Moby Tommy have been retrofitted with this facility. Presented below are a few ‘before and after’ shots, along with a couple of images from the Dana Anglia in her smart original guise, long since ripped out in a somewhat misguided DFDS 1990s refit.

Links:
Dana Anglia 1978 Main Deck GA Plan
Dana Anglia 1990 Deckplan
Pont l’Abbé 2007 Deckplan

Boarding the Moby Corse in Bastia.

Boarding the Moby Corse in Bastia.

Boarding for foot passengers is via the car deck.

Boarding for foot passengers is via the car deck.

Heading straight up to the main passenger deck, Deck 7, right aft in the ship's Brittany Ferries days was the somewhat unsatisfactory 'Le Cafe' - metal chairs, hardwearing flooring and a somewhat industrial feel made it an uninviting location for anything other than a brief snack. Originally this aft space was the Scandia Coffee Shop (to starboard) and the Compass Club discotheque (to port).

Heading straight up to the main passenger deck, Deck 7, right aft in the ship's Brittany Ferries days was the somewhat unsatisfactory 'Le Cafe', as pictured in 2007. Metal chairs, hardwearing flooring and a rather industrial feel made the port section in particular an uninviting location for anything other than a brief snack. Originally this space was the Scandia Coffee Shop (to starboard) and the Compass Club discotheque (to port).

Under Moby, although the port side still serves as a snack bar, to starboard an all-new waiter-service restaurant has been added; the 'A.O. Restaurant' (visible in the background) is named in honour of the company's founder Achille Onorato.

Under Moby, although the port side still serves as a snack bar, to starboard an all-new waiter-service restaurant has been added; the 'A.O. Restaurant' (visible in the background) is named in honour of the company's founder Achille Onorato.

'Le Cafe' servery on Pont L’Abbé in 2007.

'Le Cafe' servery on Pont l'Abbé in 2007.

The same area aboard the Moby Corse.

The same area aboard the Moby Corse.

Another 2008 image - the entrance to the reclining seat lounges and cinema can be seen to the left (astern). These have been left unchanged by Moby although the cinema is not generally in use.

Another 2008 image - the entrance to the reclining seat lounges and cinema can be seen to the left (astern). These have been left unchanged by Moby although the cinema is not generally in use.

The same area on Moby Corse.

The same area on Moby Corse.

The starboard side of 'Le Cafe' in 2008.

The starboard side of 'Le Cafe' in 2008.

The same area as part of the 'A.O. Restaurant on Moby Corse.

The same area as part of the 'A.O. Restaurant' on Moby Corse.

The same area from right aft.

'Le Cafe', seen from right aft with the children's play area on the left.

After the Moby refit - the play area has now disappeared.

After the Moby refit - the play area has now disappeared.

Moving forward, the ship's main circulation route is via the port-side arcade - seen from right aft with the old shopping centre to the right, this view is the on the Pont L’Abbé in 2007.

Moving forward, the ship's main circulation route is via the port-side arcade - seen from right aft with the old shopping centre to the right, this view is the on the Pont l'Abbé in 2007.

Moby have completely opened the arcade up - the shop has been demolished and a new pizzeria and seating area has been added together with a play area. A new, smaller, shop has been added forward.

Moby have completely opened the arcade up - the shop has been demolished and a pizzeria and seating area has been added together with a new, larger, play area. A new, smaller, shop has been added forward.

Looking aft from amidships in the arcade on the Pont L’Abbé.

Looking aft from amidships in the arcade on the Pont l'Abbé.

The new open-plan play area/pizzeria on the Moby Corse.

The new open-plan play area/pizzeria on the Moby Corse.

Wile E. Coyote at the ACME Pizzeria. Reviewing the Dana Anglia in 1978, the Naval Architect's reporter sourly commented that, 'Some of the 'murals' in the arcade give the impression that the possibility of graffiti has not been overlooked and replacement made cheap and simple'. One wonders what he would have made of the Moby Corse.

The compact new shop, just forward of the children's play area.

The compact new shop, just forward of the children's play area.

Towards the forward end of the arcade is the current Admiral Pub. Although the ship had a saloon with this name as built, that was a modern Danish space located amidships (where the forward part of the shop was as the Pont L’Abbé). When DFDS expanded the shopping facilities in the 1990s a new Admiral Pub was created in an area latterly occupied by a pair of small cinemas - but which had originally been a private dining room (to starboard) and a modernist children\'s play area (adjacent to the arcade). Depressingly kitsch, the new Admiral Pub survived through Brittany Ferries and into the Moby era - the entrance is seen here in 2007.

Towards the forward end of the arcade is the current Admiral Pub. Although the ship had a saloon with this name as built, that was a modern Danish space located amidships (where the forward part of the shop was as the Pont l'Abbé). When DFDS expanded the shopping facilities in the 1990s a new Admiral Pub was created in an area latterly occupied by a pair of small cinemas - but which had originally been a private dining room (to starboard) and a modernist children's play area (adjacent to the arcade). Depressingly kitsch, the new Admiral Pub survived through Brittany Ferries and into the Moby era - the entrance is seen here in 2007.

On the Moby Corse, Porky Pig guards the entrance but little else other than the carpet has changed.

On the Moby Corse, Porky Pig guards the entrance but little else other than the carpet has changed.

An overall view of the Admiral Pub on the Pont L’Abbé.

An overall view of the Admiral Pub on the Pont l'Abbé.

On the Moby Corse.

On the Moby Corse.

(Pont L’Abbé)

(Pont l'Abbé)

(Moby Corse)

(Moby Corse)

The original Admiral Pub on the Dana Anglia.

The original Admiral Pub on the Dana Anglia.

The Dana Anglia's original children's playroom - now the location of the current Admiral Pub.

The Dana Anglia's original children's playroom - now the location of the current Admiral Pub.

The arcade at its forward end, on the Pont L’Abbé in 2007.

The arcade at its forward end, on the Pont l'Abbé in 2007.

The same area on the Moby Corse.

The same area on the Moby Corse.

Throughout the ship's career the ship's main restaurant areas have been housed on the starboard side of the main passenger deck. As the Pont l'Abbé this became 'La Brasserie' serving a limited interpretation of the full Brittany Ferries menu - this image shows the lobby area adjacent to the entrance.

Throughout the ship's career the ship's main restaurant areas have been housed on the starboard side of the main passenger deck. As the Pont l'Abbé this became 'La Brasserie' serving a limited interpretation of the full Brittany Ferries menu - this image shows the lobby area adjacent to the entrance.

Moby have converted this into a large self-service restaurant and the lobby is seen here in its 2010 guise.

Moby have converted this into a large self-service restaurant and the lobby is seen here in its 2010 guise.

Just off the lobby is a further entranceway - a pay station on the Pont L’Abbé, as seen here.

Just off the lobby is a further entranceway - a pay station on the Pont l'Abbé, as seen here.

Today, passengers pay for food at the self service counter inside the restaurant, leaving the little entranceway in the care of Lola Bunny. Lola Bunny? Apparently she's been Bugs's "love interest" ever since the 1996 movie Space Jam.

Today, passengers pay for food at the self service counter inside the restaurant, leaving the little entranceway in the care of Lola Bunny. Lola Bunny? She's been Bugs's 'love interest' ever since the 1996 movie Space Jam. Is it indiscrete to note that Bugs Bunny is now 70 (human) years old whilst Lola looks around 16?

Looking forward in the restaurant on the Pont L’Abbé.

Looking forward in the restaurant on the Pont l'Abbé.

Moby's comprehensive refurbishment has seen the area modernised, with the dowdy DFDS-era decor completely replaced.

Moby's comprehensive refurbishment has seen the area modernised, with the dowdy DFDS-era decor completely replaced.

(Pont L’Abbé)

(Pont l'Abbé)

(Moby Corse)

(Moby Corse)

This inboard seating area on the Pont L’Abbé...

This inboard seating area on the Pont l'Abbé...

... is now the walk-through self-service servery.

... is now the walk-through self-service servery.

Looking forward on the Pont L’Abbé with the buffet counter to the left.

Looking forward on the Pont l'Abbé with the buffet counter to the left.

(Moby Corse)

A similar view on the Moby Corse.

Right forward was originally the earthily-decorated Bellevue Lounge (seen in as-built condition on the then-new Dana Anglia).

Right forward was originally the earthily-decorated Bellevue Lounge (seen in as-built condition on the then-new Dana Anglia).

Again the mid-life DFDS refit failed to do justice to this tricky space which has always somewhat suffered from a lack of headroom. It is seen here on the Pont L’Abbé, unchanged from her later Duke of Scandinavia days.

Again the mid-life DFDS refit failed to do justice to this tricky space which has always somewhat suffered from a lack of headroom. It is seen here on the Pont l'Abbé, unchanged from her later Duke of Scandinavia days.

The Moby refit has at least freshened things up a little; this remains a space best enjoyed during a night crossing.

The Moby refit has at least freshened things up a little; this remains a space best enjoyed during a night crossing.

Latterly with DFDS this became the Columbus Club and, as the Pont L’Abbé, retained its name whilst with Brittany Ferries.

Latterly with DFDS this became the Columbus Club and, as the Pont l'Abbé, retained its name whilst with Brittany Ferries.

(Moby Corse)

(Moby Corse)

As built the Dana Anglia had bar counters in three corners of the Bellevue Lounge - to ensure the swiftest table service for passengers. At-table service on the ship is now generally a thing of the past and the main bar area at the aft of the lounge suffices.

As built the Dana Anglia had bar counters in three corners of the Bellevue Lounge - to ensure the swiftest table service for passengers. At-table service on the ship is now generally a thing of the past and the main bar area at the aft of the lounge suffices.

Moving down a level, the current Deck 6 is the main cabin deck with the information desk and entrance hall amidships - seen here on the Pont L’Abbé.

Moving down a level, the current Deck 6 is the main cabin deck with the information desk and entrance hall amidships - seen here on the Pont l'Abbé.

On the Moby Corse, a gun-toting Yosemite Sam stands by as a wannabe bellboy.

On the Moby Corse, a gun-toting Yosemite Sam stands by as a wannabe bellboy.

The port-side seating area of the lobby on the Pont L’Abbé.

The port-side seating area of the lobby on the Pont l'Abbé.

This area has received a predictably Mobyesque makeover.

This area has received a predictably Mobyesque makeover.

The centreline alleyway on Deck 6 (Pont L’Abbé).

The centreline alleyway on Deck 6 (Pont l'Abbé).

(Moby Corse)

(Moby Corse)

Most of the ship's cabins have been thoroughly refurbished - such as this five berth (3+2) example.

Most of the ship's cabins have been thoroughly refurbished - such as this five berth (3+2) example.

The 'Sky Bar' on Deck 10, seen her on the Pont L’Abbé, was closed off on the Moby Corse.

Moving back upstairs, the 'Sky Bar' on Deck 10, seen here on the Pont l'Abbé, was closed off on the Moby Corse.

Outside deck - starboard side (Pont L’Abbé).

Outside deck - starboard side (Pont l'Abbé).

A coat of paint and a bit of sunshine makes all the difference (Moby Corse).

A coat of paint and a bit of sunshine makes all the difference (Moby Corse).

(Pont L’Abbé)

(Pont l'Abbé)

(Moby Corse)

(Moby Corse)

The area aft of the funnel on Deck 10...

The area aft of the funnel on Deck 10...

... now complete with kennels.

... now complete with kennels.

Aft on Deck 9, Pont L’Abbé - Le Drapeau Français.

Aft on Deck 9, Pont l'Abbé - Le Drapeau Français.

Moby Corse & Il Tricolore Italiano.

Moby Corse - Il Tricolore Italiano.

At some stage since she left Brittany Ferries service the Aalborg builders' plate, seen here on the Pont L’Abbé in 2008, has gone missing.

At some stage since she left Brittany Ferries service the Aalborg builders' plate, seen here on the Pont l'Abbé in 2008, has gone missing.

The Moby Corse at Livorno

After disembarkation, the Moby Corse at Livorno.

The Pont L’Abbé at Roscoff

The Pont l'Abbé at Roscoff.

What, then, to make of the Moby Corse? Although I was something of a fan of her retro virtues on the Roscoff route, to fully fit into any mainstream operator’s fleet the Pont l’Abbé was in need of a thorough refit. Moby Lines have given her just that and, whilst much of the decor is generic to other ships in the fleet, it is fair to say that the ship has been given a new lease of life. Whilst they have several modern ships, most of Moby’s ferries are older ships which are modernised and well maintained. As has been seen with the success of the Moby Fantasy on the Olbia-Civitavecchia route, the elderliness of Moby’s fleet is not necessarily the key factor by which passengers judge them. Instead, an astutely cultivated image together with a thoroughly modernised on board offering sees families flocking to the company throughout the intensive Summer months. The aggressive self-promotion, liveries and Looney Tunes might not appeal to everyone – but it has been key to Moby’s success. The new French venture meanwhile has opened up another front in the war with Corsica/Sardinia Ferries and, as the Moby Corse seems to have been a qualified success on her Toulon sailings, one wonders if there will be a second ship on the route for 2011, opening up the possibility of daily departures and a real foothold in the freight market.

Picture of the week 21 April 2009 – Moby Otta & Bithia

Moby Otta (ex-Tor Scandinavia) passes Tirrenia's Bithia outside the port of Olbia. Click for larger image.

Moby Otta (ex-Tor Scandinavia) passes Tirrenia's Bithia outside the port of Olbia. Click for larger image.

Last week's picture

Last week's picture

Moby Dreams


Moby’s vivid hull colour schemes aren’t to everyone’s taste but, in a market where the most energetic opposition is screaming at potential customers in bright yellow, it doesn’t hurt to have something eye-catching for them to hang their hat on, especially when in comparison it would be all too easy to disappear into Eurowhite-style forgettability alongside the Gruppo Tirrenia.

Personally I have to say I’m a fan – I find it somewhat ironic that ships which, when built, were quite aggressively modern such as the Tor Britannia and Tor Scandinavia are now referred to as being in some way stripped of their dignity with these schemes (as the Moby Drea and Moby Otta). Some would say that happened way back during the Triangle years but one thing is certain – they were, and remain, ships built for fun. There is, after all, no reason that ferries have to be deeply serious objects, especially since they are engaged so often in the leisure and holiday trade.

Here we present pictures from the past couple of years showing aspects of the colour schemes of the current Moby fleet.

Piombino

Piombino

Moby Fantasy

Moby Fantasy

Moby Fantasy


Moby Fantasy

Moby Fantasy


Moby Fantasy

Moby Fantasy

Moby Otta

Moby Otta in Livorno

Moby Otta in Livorno


Moby Otta

Moby Otta

Moby Otta

Moby Otta

Moby Otta

Moby Otta

Moby Otta

Moby Otta

Moby Otta

Moby Otta

Moby Otta

Moby Otta

Moby Otta

Moby Otta

Moby Otta

Moby Otta

Moby Aki

Moby Aki

Moby Aki

Moby Aki

Moby Aki

Moby Wonder

Moby Wonder

Moby Wonder

Moby Tommy

Moby Tommy - sunrise in Livorno

Moby Tommy - sunrise in Livorno

Moby Tommy

Moby Tommy

Moby Vincent

Moby Vincent

Moby Vincent

Moby Vincent - keeping the whiskers clean under a watchful eye

Moby Vincent - keeping the whiskers clean under a watchful eye

Moby Vincent

Moby Vincent

Moby Vincent

Moby Vincent

Moby Drea

Moby Drea

Moby Drea

Moby Drea

Moby Drea

Moby Drea

Moby Drea

Moby Drea

Moby Drea

Moby Drea

Moby Drea

Moby Drea

Moby Drea

Moby Drea

Moby Drea

Moby Freedom

Moby Freedom at Olbia

Moby Freedom at Olbia

Moby Freedom

Moby Freedom

The Elba ships
None of the Elba ferries currently has a Looney Tunes livery, these five ships instead retaining their idiosyncratic separate identities. This is more than can be said for the Giraglia’s sister, the Bastia on the Santa Teresa di Gallura-Bonifacio route which, together with the former Lloyd Sardegna ro-pax Maria Grazia On, retains just the big blue whale for hull markings.

Moby Lally (design by ‘Projekt Silver’)

Moby Lally

Moby Lally

Moby Lally

Moby Lally

Moby Lally

Moby Lally

Moby Lally

Moby Lally

Giraglia

Giraglia

Giraglia

Moby Love (design by Mordillo)

Moby Love

Moby Love

Moby Love

Moby Love

Moby Love

Moby Love

Moby Love

Moby Love

Moby Love

Moby Love

Moby Baby (design by Ettore Sottsass Jr.)

Moby Baby

Moby Baby

Moby Baby

Moby Baby

Moby Baby

Moby Baby

Moby Ale (design by Ettore Sottsass Jr.)

Moby Ale

Moby Ale

Moby Ale

Moby Ale

Moby Ale

Moby Ale

Moby Ale

Moby Ale

Moby Ale

Moby Ale

Moby Ale

Moby Ale

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